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UT Health San Antonio Discusses HIV

UT Health Discusses HIV (SBG Photo)

SAN ANTONIO- Dr. Wari Allison, UT Health San Antonio Infectious Disease Specialist, and Janeli Saucedo-Castrejana, the Director of Development of the San Antonio AIDS Foundation joined us for a conversation about HI. UT Health San Antonio has recently received a $6.4 million grant to study people living with HIV and Hepatitis C in San Antonio and South Texas. Dr. Wari Allison will be collaborating with staff members from five HIV clinics in San Antonio and South Texas, including the San Antonio Aids Foundation. The focus of the study is to improve Hepatitis C screenings, as well as treatment for individuals with HIV and Hepatitis C. The program will serve as a pilot project to collect surveillance data on individuals living with HIV and Hepatitis C. Currently, the state does not require this type of collection data. Dr. Allison explained that when a person living with HIV also has Hepatitis C, they are at a greater risk of developing liver cancer. This is important because South Texas has one of the highest rates of liver cancer in the nation. In addition, South Texas has the highest population of Hispanics and Blacks and a high prevalence of poverty, which prevents people from the care they need.

UT Health San Antonio has recently received a $6.4 million dollar grant to study people living with HIV and Hepatitis C in San Antonio and South Texas. Dr. Wari Allison will be collaborating with staff members from five HIV clinics in San Antonio and South Texas, including the San Antonio Aids Foundation. The focus of the study is to improve Hepatitis C screenings, as well as treatment for individuals with HIV and Hepatitis C. The program will serve as a pilot project to collect surveillance data on individuals living with HIV and Hepatitis C. Currently, the state does not require this type of collection data.

Dr. Allison explained that when a person living with HIV also has Hepatitis C, they are at a greater risk of developing liver cancer. This is important because South Texas has one of the highest rates of liver cancer in the nation. In addition, South Texas has the highest population of Hispanics and Blacks and a high prevalence of poverty, which prevents people from the care they need.

Part two of our interview focused on the health concerns and effects of living with HIV. The main concern of living with HIV is to ensure you are taking your medication properly. It is important to take the medication on time each day and follow up with your doctor regularly. It is also crucial that you get enough rest, exercise, and have a balanced diet. People living with HIV need to be conscious of any risks they are taking with their health. Being diagnosed with the disease is difficult, but social factors such as family and relationship dynamics make the issue even more difficult and prevent people from confirming their status.

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